As the title states, I have a new horn installed.  It started "shorting" out before it went fizzle.  I took the steering wheel off, got to the ground and other wires, along with fuses, and all is cool.  Any ideas?

 

#2

What's the easiest way to fix a "lazy" wiper that can't keep up with the other?

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MY72BUG
I have a stock horn in my supply of stuff that might some day come in handy.  I know that it works just fine.  I did a test on it that you may want to repeat.   I am assuming that the "new" horn that you bought is also a stock VW.  Using an ohmeter or anything that will test electrical continuity, test from one electrical terminal to the other on the horn.  There should be continuity.  Test from each of the terminals to ground on the body of the horn.  There should be zero continuity, the terminals should be isolated from the body of the horn.  I get the feeling that you are going to find that one of your terminals goes to ground on the body of the horn. ( By "new " did you mean brand new or just different?)



I'd rather have a partial bottle in front of me than a partial frontal lobotomy.
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MY72BUG
OOPs.  I tabbed out before I could speculate on the wiper business.  One motor works one arm which goes to two pivots which move the two wiper arms.  If one is "lazy" , I would examine where the wiper arm pivot comes out through the cowl.  Disconnect the arm from the motor and by hand try to pivot the piece that goes through the cowl.  I would bet that the one is seizing up.  Try a shot of Release-All or WD-40 and see if the little bugger frees up a bit.  Your wiper motor will thank you.  Another possibility could be the wiper blade itself.  If one is mega-old and provides no friction on the windshield the other one could tend to drag.  Try switching the blades and see if the other side becomes the laggard.  Good luck with the projects.  Dan ( MY72BUG) in Goderich, Ont.
I'd rather have a partial bottle in front of me than a partial frontal lobotomy.
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