Hello,

I've slowly been working on my '74.  I have had it apart for about a year.  I have taken the body off the chassis and had it blasted and have started the restore with the chassis and engine.  I desparately need some help with the engine stuff.  I am mechanically inclined, but time was not on my side, so I sent my engine to Just Vee Dubs.  This company is no longer in business.  In fact, they change business names on a regular basis - Vdubs World was the latest I could find.  Big crooks - stay away.  Anyway, I got my engine back with some new stuff installed, but I'm trying to get all the pieces that were not sent back.  I have the Bentley Manual, but it doesn't show very good pics of the lower cooling tins.  I have tins mounted between the cylinders and the pushrod tubes, but I remember another set of tins that was level with the bottom of the oil pan.  Anyone know what I'm talking about?  Does anyone have a picture of the lower tins installed?  Also, can anyone tell me how I can tell if my engine has been upgraded to a 1776cc?  Any help would be greatly appreciated.  How can I verify that my cooling flaps are fixed open so my engine doesn't roast?  I didn't get my thermostat assembly back either.  Thanks. 
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MY72BUG
Hi Weshope:  All is not lost even though this bug outfit did you some ill deeds.  I have looked through my books and it is difficult to find any diagrams showing the cooling tin.  The parts you are talking about can be found in the CIP1 catalogue which is available by clicking on their advertisement in this site.  Go to the site and enter " engine tin " in the search.  Look for part # C13-8948.  These are the lower sections that bolt onto the lower edge of the engine case ( oil pan )  You can see two of these tapped holes on each side of the casting.  The right side is two piece, the left is one.  The other sides bolt onto the heat exchangers.  The upper part of the curve bolts onto the upper front engine tin.  If you have all of the bits it fits together in a very logical pattern.  ALL of this tin is important for keeping your engine running cool.  As for the cooling louvres there is a flat joining rod under the opening for the cooling fan on the " dog house "  It joins the driver's side ( cyl. 3 and 4 ) louvres to the passenger's side ( Cyl. 1 and 2 ) louvres.  If you pull toward you on the 1and2 side the louvres open on both sides.  If you push away the louvres close.  The thermostat accomplishes this.  As mine is a summer only car I have wired open my cooling louvres and have never had trouble with my engine.  If the thermostat system was ultra reliable I might consider attaching a thermostat.  I have more to fear from overheating an engine than I do from running a bit cool and paying the price with higher gas consumption.  Check out part # VWC 113198 100 This shows a whole cooling tin set.  With the larger pieces in place the smaller pieces will fill in the holes until the whole unit is shrouded.  Try to find a local VW club or check out a meet where a lot of owners get together.  Where abouts do you live?  There should be people near you who share your interest and who will not rip you off.   As for your 1776,  the only way that I would be able to tell the size would be to remove the head and mike the inside diameter of the cylinder bore.  Nothing externally can give you that information especially if the rebuilder has already jerked you around.  The stock pistons are ( I believe ) 85.5 mm and the 1776CC are  90mm.  I may stand corrected on that one. 
     When your project is underway, register your convertible on the international Beetle convertible registry in Germany.  The multilingual web site is at TYP15.com. MY72BUG is entry #330.   Good luck with the project.  If I find any better pictures of cooling tin I will let you know.   Dan ( MY72BUG) in Goderich, Ontario, Canada

I'd rather have a partial bottle in front of me than a partial frontal lobotomy.
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Thanks for all the info.  I have located a guy in Johnson City that has tons of old VW parts and as much knowledge to go with them.  I was able to buy the tins from him.  I asked him about having the thermostat and cooling flaps vs. not having them and he says it depends on who you talk to.  He says he likes to put them back in if the engine had them when he gets it in his shop.  What's your opinion on the cooling system?  Living in TN, it gets hot in the summers.  The winters aren't too bad - nothing like Winnipeg in the winter or Ontario. 

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MY72BUG
Your mechanic is right - everybody has a different perspective on this.  My car is a summer car so I can get by without a thermostat.  I do let her warm up a bit in the driveway before I hit the road and for the first mile or so I may get a stall when I come to a stop.  After that all is clear sailing.  What I know I will NOT have is a stuck thermostat causing my engine to overheat and this is an all too frequent issue with these old cars.  My louvres are wired open - dead safe.  Now; if I was using my Beetle in cool or cold weather, I would not be without a thermostat - otherwise your engine would never warm up, your mileage would suffer and the engine would be labouring all the time.  SO.  In my opinion, if your mechanic can guarantee that your thermostat will be a model citizen and do its duty flawlessly, go for it.  If not - wire it open and play it safe.  Any other input out there?  Dan (MY72BUG) in Goderich  ( 34 degrees C. 92 F. today - we don't need no stinking thermostat in this heat )
I'd rather have a partial bottle in front of me than a partial frontal lobotomy.
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