superunknown
My 73 dp, 009dist,30/31solex...Had the car for 12 years..always had the same setup which I am told is a bad combo,but it has worked for me..I was driving the other night running fantastic,power band was awesome,passed a few cars etc...next thing you know it starts running weird.I managed to get it home but it has little power...Changed plugs & wires,totally cleaned the fuel system,swapped out coils,even ditched the points for electronic ignition..Still fairly weak..Idles fantastic,but it just seems like it has a slight hesitation & still has no power band like before..Plans are for tomorrow to adjust the valves,but after that I don't know..Suggestions please...
Thanks,T
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MY72BUG
Hmmmm.   I might start with a cold compression test and then another done after you have warmed up the engine.  Some carbon under a valve seat might undo you.  Do you hear any chuffing from the exhaust?  Have you tested the fuel pressure delivered by the fuel pump?  If the mechanical is hanging up you might idle OK but have fuel loss at speed.  Are you sure that there is no exhaust obstruction or obstruction in the air into the carb?  I know a guy whose bug sucked up a piece of a plastic bag ( long story) and diagnosing the problem took forever because you just don't suspect that.  Can fuel contamination be a possibility?  Lastly, a sticking carb float might starve your mill of gas  as might a crimped fuel line.  I can guarantee you that it will be the last thing you look for!   Dan ( MY72BUG - frozen in Goderich, Ont.)
I'd rather have a partial bottle in front of me than a partial frontal lobotomy.
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superunknown

I swapped the carb (from 31 to a 34 i had in my parts stash) & adjusted the valves,still no change..Next plan to tackle is fuel lines & swap fuel pump from my 74 bug.My fuel lines are not german woven types so the possibility of shrinkage is there..This time I'm truley stumped...Fuel  system has been drained & cleaned..My air filter is a week old & my stinger is not obstructed (ask the neighbors). It almost seems electrical but I've removed & replace the points & condensor with elec. ignit.The car is charging,battery is strong & less than a year old...I'm out of money to throw at it & my patients with it are thin as you could imagine..

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MY72BUG
A few more thoughts along the lines of fuel delivery. 
1. Are you running a stock choke on your PICT carb?  If so, have you checked that it is not sticking partly closed?  Smooth choke operation is a must have.
2. Are you running your car in a cool climate?  Even at 40 to 50 degrees F. ( about 5 to 12 degrees C up here ) your car can develop icing in the carburetor which will manifest itself exactly as you describe your problem.  Are you running an aftermarket air breather which does not include a warm air pickup and a warm air duct to the carb?  A lot of bugs run little round paper type filtres without the warm air duct.  OK for deep down south or up here in the heart of summer but an invitation to carb icing.  Yes.  Ice will form at temperatures above freezing due to Bernoulli's principle.  The venturi of the carburetor accelerates the mixture movement causing a drop in temperature in the carb.  Ice will form choking out your engine.  You stop, it melts and the engine idles just fine.
3.  You have switched carbs but there is still the matter of a hung up float to consider.  Also; take a look in the throat of the carb.  Inside that venturi you will see a series of double holes.  These are the fuel passages and they cannot be glazed over with fuel varnish or plugged with crud.  I used a strand of ultra fine stainless steel wire and cleaned out these passages to cure my Pict.  I am still thinking fuel delivery as the source of your problem.   Dan ( MY72 BUG) in Goderich

I'd rather have a partial bottle in front of me than a partial frontal lobotomy.
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superunknown

Turns out it Had a weak fuel pump...Never had one that didnt just die..I swapped it with the one on my other car & it came back to life..Now I just need to set the timing....Next comes new front brakes..

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MY72BUG
Good to hear that the problem is solved.  It seemed like a fuel delivery problem and that was what it turned out to be.  With the brake work - have you considered a disc brake conversion?  I found that the drums all round, while being true to restoration, are just too much " press and pray ".  I bought an all out conversion kit and with the results,  for the first time felt safe on the road.  If you are at the stage where everything needs to be replaced  (shoes, drums, wheel cylinders, flex lines ) do yourself a huge favour and buy the all in a box conversion kit.  Check them out at CIP 1 or one of the other suppliers.  I am a middlin' shade tree mechanic and was able to knock off this job in about 2 hours.  You can go all out and do discs on the rear too but that is not as necessary as your front brakes do about 70 per cent of your stopping.  Give it some thought.  A car that really goes is great - a car that really stops is priceless!   Dan ( MY72 BUG) in Goderich
I'd rather have a partial bottle in front of me than a partial frontal lobotomy.
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superunknown

I'd like to go disc ,but if I do I need to narrow my front beam first...The discs tend to stick out an inch on each side & I'm already running porsche wheel adapters...I intend to swap it all over with dropped spindals & porsche pattern,but I'm in a little financial bind right now so I have to wait...I'll probably hae to patch it together cheaply right now(drums & shoes)... at least until I can shell out about $500 to CB Performance......

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MY72BUG
Since you are staying with the drums for now there are a few simple things that can aid your braking.  1.  When you finish the assembly of the brakes, bleed the whole assembly not just to remove the air in the lines but to also remove all of the old brake fluid.  Over the years it gets contaminated with water and dirt and does not perform the way it is supposed to.  2. When you are adjusting your drum brakes, turn out the star wheels until the shoe is actually right tight against the drum - to the point where you cannot budge the drum  THEN back off the adjusters equally just a bit at a time until the shoe  barely touches the drum.  At one point I had way too much pedal and very ineffective braking until an old VW mechanic taught me that trick   3. Examine your flex lines.  These have a habit of deteriorating on the inside where it cannot be seen.  They act like one way valves allowing the brake fluid to go to the wheel cylinder but then not allowing the fluid to flow back to the master cylinder again.  New flex lines are cheap.  If yours have never been replaced and you are already working on the system, just assume that they are bad and get rid of them.  Last summer I improved my rear brake operation by doing just that.  Good luck with the project.  Dan ( MY72BUG) in Goderich
I'd rather have a partial bottle in front of me than a partial frontal lobotomy.
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