Seattlebug
Hi,

When I got my Bug it had an aftermarket (Kymco? Klymco?) 75-amp alternator in it. Well, yesterday the belt shredded on it, and the rubber-and-string python wrapped around the pulley with such force that it cross-threaded the nut on the shaft. As I backed it off, a little corkscrew of steel appeared and crawled out of the nut as I unscrewed it. At the sight of that "my heart fell," as they used to say, and I discovered that I could no longer use the alternator. The shaft threading was stripped.

Fortunately I had a stock alternator sitting around, but when I hooked it up, I discovered that the connecting wiring was different for the two alternators, and the car had only two wires available--the B+ and one other one. I hooked them up, but of course I didn't get a charge. Then I found where one wire had been cut, so I did the logical (if not right) thing to do: I put a connector on the end of that one and hooked it up to the alternator, but no good.

OK, does anyone know of a description of the wires that connect to the alternator? I have a Chilton's but there are some things that the book does not cover. This is one of them.

The way the engine deck lid spring is installed is another. It's always the little things, isn't it? Right now I have a stick that holds up the deck lid when I work on the engine. I have the spring, but I haven't figured out how it works, and I can't find a picture or a description of it so far.

It's a good thing that air-cooled VWs are so much fun. Would we go through this otherwise?
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Wayne
Here's a link to a page that shows the alternator wiring

and one that shows a picture of the deck lid spring,taken from the VW microfiche.

I hope that these help.

I could take a picture of the spring on my deck lid if need be.
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Seattlebug
Wayne,

Thank you. That will be a big help. NOw, if I can just get the alternator wired right before it rains. Who was it who said that Seattle has two seasons: winter and August? WEll, it's not August any more, Toto. It'll rain.
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Ryan
I presume your stock Alt has the one main wire (B+), and then the three male spade connectors, D+, D-, and DF. You need an external regulator for this setup. Here's a link to the wiring for it.
http://www.nls.net/mp/volks/schem/altreg.gif
This is Speedy Jims site. A great reference for some obscure electrical stuff. --Ryan
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Seattlebug
Thanks, Ryan. That will help a lot.
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Marc
How many wires does your car have for the alternator? (the black one doesn't count, it only goes to the diagnostic link on the firewall).
Cars which came with the externally-regulated alternator have, in addition to the large B+ wire, three small wires in the harness that lead to the regulator location under the LR seat - red, green, and brown. The blue wire that operates the warning light taps in to the red wire at the regulator.
Cars which came with the internally-regulated alternator have only the B+ and the blue D+ wire for the warning light - if yours is one of these and you install an externally-regulated alternator there will not be enough wires in the harness to support mounting a regulator in the "normal" location and you'll have to put it in the engine compartment (or fish some more wires into the back-seat area).
I once salvaged a generator with wasted threads by cutting them down and rethreading to 10x1.5, it might be worth a shot to see if you can save that 75A unit.
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Seattlebug
Marc,

The car came with the external VR, and in fact that VR is still there, down by the floor behind the driver's seat. It was just unplugged with the plug hanging loose. So everything was there for the stock alternator. It had just been clipped in the engine bay and tossed. Eventually, when I knew what I should be looking for, I found them (we see what we recognize, right? Thanks, guys. You've been a big help), and the stock alternator is humming along quite nicely, thank you.

I do intend to keep that Kymco Super 75. A friend of mine who loves to work on cars (he has one of the biggest home garages I have ever seen--he has a '68 Camaro and a '57 Chevy Bel Aire in it, it houses his 3/4-ton Dodge Ram and his wife's Buick Grand National along with a 27-foot boat, and he still has room for a '55 pickup he's working on for a friend, his hydraulic lift, his 8-foot lathe, and a big floor-mounted milling machine) has offered to do just what you've suggested: turn the shaft down just enough to rethread it. I'm going to take him up on that. The alternator looks like it cost about $200, and it's always a good idea to keep a good part in the box.
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