KarenTheBug
Got a quick question - I bought a 1971 Beetle (not super) recently, engine has been partially rebuilt by previous owner.  Recently I had a problem where the engine was stalling out, rough acceleration, running HOT, etc.  Determined the issue was a leak in the driver's side manifold intake.  My mechanic adjusted the fast idle pin and fiddled the air mixture on the carb so it would quit stalling out so I could drive it home, and I didn't drive it until I replaced the manifold seal.

I put the new seal on yesterday, did my best to adjust the air mixture (seems good ... the fast idle pin is backed out about 2/3 of the way, and using the bypass and volume screws in concert - as best I could - the engine runs pretty smooth and accelerates with about 2x the horsepower it had when I bought it).  I've also noticed that, as long as the engine is on, the deck lid / vent louvers are nice and cold to the touch, something I didn't have last time.

I have, however, noticed a loud HISSSSSSSSSSSing sound, which I eventually tracked down to the air filter on top of the carb.  It's a fancy chromed out piece with a circular filter inside - you can see pictures of the engine (and the rest of the bug) at the website I'm maintaining to track my progress restoring it - http://www.karenthebug.com .

Now to get to my question: Is it normal to hear a hissing sound coming from the air filter, even at idle?  It's obviously louder when I hit the throttle, and I can only hear it when I'm back there and the deck lid is up, but I don't remember hearing it before (I assume I don't remember hearing it before because the intake manifold had a major leak, and the last owner just adjusted the carb to get it running).  Like I said, you can see pictures of what kind of air filter it has at the webpage, that may make a difference.  You can also see the driver's side intake manifold seal, pre-replacement (put an EMPI split design on until I have the money to pay a mechanic to tear the manifold apart and put a solid boot over it).

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olspeed
It sounds from what you describe that you are hearing normal intake noise. The filter you have would do nothing to quiet this noise. The stock unit would do much to quiet what you are hearing.
Olspeed
66 Ghia 76 std Beetle
It's not a car it's a VolksWagon
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KarenTheBug
Cool, thanks for the info.  Like I keep telling people, I'm only bringing it back to stock because I'm trying to re-create (re-capture?) some childhood memories of the old bug we had when I was a kid - it was ten years old when I was born, and 15 years old when I have my first memories of it, so I don't plan on making this look showroom new.  My goal here is to have a good looking (which I think I already do), well-maintained, and solid running car - just like the clunker (as we called our bug).

Will a stock unit give me any benefit as far as engine life before needing any rebuild work?  I don't care too much about performance, really - it already has more "get up and go" than my 2000 New Beetle, as far as I'm concerned, and I only drive it a few times a week when I need my daily dose of nostalgia.  My main concern with all the aftermarket "hot rodding" the last guy did to this poor thing is to first do no harm, meaning make sure the parts he put on are either as safe for longevity of the vehicle, if not better than original OEM.

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olspeed
The stock air cleaner for your year car would only make it more "original" or "OEM" than what you have now. The only question I would have is do you live in a cooler climate where you would need carb heat in the winter. Or if you park it during the cold months you should have no problems with the air cleaner you have now. If you do want to drive it in cool weather then you will have some problems with icing on the intake manifold, but the can be solved without replacing the air cleaner.
Olspeed
66 Ghia 76 std Beetle
It's not a car it's a VolksWagon
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KarenTheBug
Sounds good.  I live in central VA, so our weather goes from the occasional upper-90s in the summer to the rare sub-freezing temperatures in the winter.  For right now I'm parking outside (I hope to buy a place with a garage next year).  I really don't intend to drive in sub-freezing weather, just because of the risk of black ice (and idiot drivers speeding, sliding, and smashing into my fine German automobile).  Plus there's also salty slush on the roads, sand & gravel ... winter time is a nightmare for cars.

Winter will likely be starting her up & letting her run for about 20-30 minutes one or two days a week, maybe a quick trip for groceries once a week to get her up through the gears & back down to make sure everything's good & the battery is fresh. 

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