bradley
I have another question, I have been driving my bug now for about a month and a half, it runs really well but over the last few weeks it has been raining like crazy here in Calgary. I changed (but kept) my stock air filter to a K&N style chrome air filter. I'm not sure if this is what it is but on rainy days my bug doesn't really want to idle at stop signs etc, I have to keep pumping the gas to keep it going. It still runs fine though while driving. When it's not raining it'll idle all day. I never drove it in the rain with the stock filter so I don't know if it has something to do with that or not, I'm thinking of the warm air from the motor might help this with the stock filter. I packed it up and took a load to BC where I'm moving in two weeks so I can't just put it back on right now. My bug is a 1974 standard, stock carb. There is a half inch or so, nipple coming off the bottom of the chrome filter that I just plugged when I put it on, would it help to hook that up the the oil breather where the stock filter hooked up to? And, does anyone know, technically speaking, why the humidity or moisture does this?
Thanks in advance, Bradley.
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Wayne

If you're having wet weather problems I'd look at the wires and coil. If your wires are going bad they will arch when wet and you won't get proper spark. You can test them by touching them while the engine is running, you'll get a slight shock if they are NG. Or lay a screwdriver across the wires and put the end close to metal. If you see a spark jumping across, your wires are leaking and should be replaced.

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bradley
Thanks Wayne, but just before the rain started here I replaced the plugs, wires, cap, rotor, points, condensor and the coil so I can't see it being electrical. Do you think it could be just sucking actual water in the carb?
I'm not too worried, I can drive with three feet pretty good, but it would be nice to take care of it.
Thanks, Bradley.
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olspeed
Hi Bradley
are you running a stock exhaust or a header and if it is a header did you block off the the carb heat tubes. It sounds like you have a stock carb and manifold, or at least a single carb manifold. these have to have heat running along the pipe that connects between the two heads or the fuel will condense and puddle,giving the symptoms that you are describing. If you are running a stock manifold or a older aftermarket one you might want to check to make sure that the heat riser tubes are not plugged with carbon.The stock one that I got to put on my Ghia when I switched back to the stock carb was plugged and I had a bear of a time getting it cleaned out. Also if I were you I would go ahead and plumb the breather in to the air cleaner as it will scavenge fumes from the crankcase better than just running it out to ????  The only other thing I can think of right now is if you have a new header system were the holes drilled in to the pipe for the heat risers, when I bought a header the last time it had the tubes and mounts for the heat riser welded on but they had not drilled the exhaust tube so it would not flow( I also didn't need the block offs when I put the dual carbs on it.)
66 Ghia 76 std Beetle
It's not a car it's a VolksWagon
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bradley
Hi olspeed,

I do have stock exhaust and that sounds like a good thing to try, to see if the tubes are plugged with carbon but I will have to wait for a couple of weeks until I move so I can work on it easier.
Thanks for the info, Bradley.
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68autobug
Yes,
that may be your problem..
its usually a cold weather problem, not normally a wet weather problem.
I did have an after market air cleaner on My engine but it wouldn't have been any good in the rain so I bought another aftermarket one that is chromed with louvered vents all around it, so that water cannot wet the filter which would stop a lot of the air to the engine...
 
I have just replaced the aftermarket filter with a genuine VW beetle one
and I have added the hot ait tube to it too, so that I have warm/hot air entering My carburetor..
as its winter time down here, and My carburetor iced up..
so My inlet manifold heat riser pipes are blocked too..
so I'm looking for another inlet manifold...
but the hot air into the carby and the stock VW oil bath air filter will help
Me at the moment...
 
so it sounds like Your engine is being choked when the engine gets wet..
not enough air.. also spray the coil and distributor etc with WD40 or similar
water displacer..
 
cheers from Australia
 
LEE
 
 
Lee Noonan
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bradley

Thanks Lee,

That makes sense that the filter might be getting wet and not let the air through as well. I'm anxious to see if those tubes are blocked too, but like I said, I'm moving soon so I have to wait. I'm driving my car to work everyday also, so I don't want to be stuck without my bug if I start taking things apart here and can't get it back together right away.
I also just found something when I got home tonight, I don't know how much vacuum might have to do with this but I noticed my little rubber cap was leaking pretty bad, rotted, going to the nipple on the intake tube, I guess you would call it, right under the carb but on the tube, it was a line that ran to my stock aircleaner. I put a new cap on but it probably won't rain here for a while.
I guess a little gas gets onto the rubber and eats it, I need to get some propper caps meant for gas.
I also don't know if this was sucking air when it was raining or not but I thought I would mention it.
Thanks for all your help, Bradley. 


Thanks for the picture Lee, very nice!

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olspeed
Hi Lee
 Cheers to you dear sir. I don't know how bad it rains down there but I really don't think that the air filter would plug up from rain. I think it would let water pass through but would kind of atomize it. I do know that wet dirty filters will plug but it's the dirt not the water. One example I know of would be dual carb's and the air cleaners that come with the kits. Both my 44 and ITC weber kits have a exposed filter media with a wire mesh enclosure,and would be quite susceptible to water plugging if this was the case. I have run these types of carbs for 20 years in Bugs,(baja's too) a Thing, and my Ghia. They have been run in weather ranging from high 70's  to - 50 F with no problems. In the cold they even idle on a cold engine after giving it about 2 minutes to warm up the heads! The main reason you don't get this sort of problem with with dual carbs is the short manifolds heat up so quickly from the heads. But before I get too far off track here,we are dealing with a single stock carb. Most of the time at least up here in Alaska when it rains the temperature also drops a certain amount, also water acts as a cooling agent when put in an air stream (water injection for turbo's) this in itself will cool down the intake manifold especially if the stock heating system is not putting out at it full capacity, and make your engine stall and give you that cold weather problem. If you look closely at the Baja behind mine in my Avatar you will notice that it has one of those chrome aftermarket open air filters on a deep wading extension from the stock carb. the only thing that the owner did was to pop rivet a plate on the edge of the top cover toward the front of the car so it would keep the bugs and the dirt off of the foam filter. Also this picture was taken when we were out hunting in the fall up on the south side of denali (amazing where a Bug will take you!) morning temp's around 30 F and notice no warm air intake. The owner of this Bug built a winter air cleaner by taking a tupperware container that fit around the filter and epoxied it on, then he epoxied a 2" plastic nipple to the side of the tupperware container and ran the hose from the warm air intake for the stock aircleaner  and ran it up to the nipple.The car ran that way in the winter for at least 5 years that I know of. 
66 Ghia 76 std Beetle
It's not a car it's a VolksWagon
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